Access to this Forum

Hi

For several months I have only been able to access this forum using my desktop running on Windows 7

I cannot access it on my ipad, my Android phne or my laptop running on Windows 10

It doesn't appear to be anything to do with cookies as far as I can tell

Can anyone suggest what might be the issue here ?

I have no problems with any other sites and/or forums

Woz

Comments

  • Hello Wozzit - Have you tried logging out on your Windows 7 desktop before trying to access from another of your devices? It could be that only one access at a time is permitted.
  • edited January 15
    Fixed Income Investor is operated by independent analysts Stockcube Research. Do these folks have enough funding for this platform what with such forums closing shop in the past
  • Wozzit, I have had a similar problem to get to the forum. It only seems accessible if I use a different browser from my normal safari, or if I go to recent discussions which then does manage to get me here. If I click on forum then I get nowhere!
    Bit of a shame as this used to be a useful forum....but dearth of new bonds plus fact that it seems to have been taken over by an idiot makes it less so
  • safari is a problematic browser, chrome should help

    if the idiot is causing you emotional pressure, break your inertia and move on -

  • Many thanks to you all for your comments and suggestions.I had forgotten to say I am using 3 different browsers, although I hadn't tried Chrome.

    However, pdepps suggestion works for me on all my devices (although I had to enter the URL to gain access on my mobile as I couldn't locate the "Recent Discussions" link)

    Anyway, I can now gain access from all my devices (again).

    I was loathe to ask for help (if indeed it is still available) from FII/Stockcube as I would hate them to use sorting it out as an excuse to close this lovely little forum down !

    Woz
  • Oxford University Bond offering - I don't think this offering is advisable for us standard retail investors, just the length of the bond 100 years will make it very price sensitive to interest rates & inflation - with the main possibility (certainty) that yields will rise - wiping the valuation by -90%!
    Most of my new money is going on new renewables / Infrastructure funds , eg NESF & ORIT (ticker codes). No new bonds available!
    I have too much undated securities eg Pref shares & PIBS
  • edited January 16
    Oxford University Bond offering - I don't know if retail folks can access this, maybe on secondary market - https://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?p=73538839

    yields outlook - https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-01-09/low-bond-yields-here-to-stay-after-decade-of-denial-says-hsbc

    wiping the valuation by 90% - 90% decline needs more than rise in yields, probably 100% default probability?
  • Arjungaur - I can't see Oxford University going bust, then then who knows what is going to happen in say 50 years, doubtful you & I will be still be on this planet!
    Twice in my lifetime I have seen mortgage rates at 15%
    Not sure what the bond pricing would be if say the yield was to become say 18 to 20%? (with base rate of 15%).
    Anybody retail investor in such securities at low yields would be mad!

    However, my gut feeling, yields are likely to stay low.
    HSBC would like to them to stay low for ever, partly as they have a very strong financial interest, in particular as they have a large number of 10 Year Fixed Term Mortgages on their books at very low rates (I assume they have hedged for the possibility for an unlikely interest rate rise!)
  • edited January 16
    i haven't seen financial statements for oxford, my best guess is that they are leveraging their fixed assets like all these social sector folks like gsht. As long as their assets, revenues, profits climb faster than the interest cost, then they shouldn't attract any attention. In case of trouble, i would expect govt bail out what with so many of those elites using it as their credential - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boris_Johnson

    i am guessing these long dated bonds are good for long dated balance sheets like sovereign wealth funds or rockefeller foundation - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rockefeller_Foundation

    mortgage rates at 15% - this paradigm shift could happen and would catch a lot of people by surprise - https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/paradigm-shifts-ray-dalio/

    Haha, I just used the bond pricer for 2% coupon 100 year annual bond and find it loosing 90% value at 20% yield, your experience certainly provided you correct estimate for wiping the valuation by 90% - https://www.investopedia.com/calculator/bondprice.aspx
  • edited January 16
    yields are reflective of growth and inflation and these are likely to be subdued like in case of Japan driven by - demographics, technology, globalisation, income inequality

    HSBC research team is separate from HSBC Treasury Team - so i would hope Steven Major here is giving his honest opinion irrespective of how his firm finds this lower for longer environment

    Banks generally are hedged for structural interest rate exposures, their future business though is dependent on how steep is the curve and the absolute levels of rates. This is intuitive as steeper curve allows them to earn interest rate differential from borrowing at short end and lending at long end. The higher level of absolute level of rates, like i said above, is reflective of higher growth and more activity in the economy, and thus need for more financial services as the lubricant for the rest of the GDP
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